mei 032013
 
VLA Finds Background Radio Emission is Submitted by Galaxies

  Staring at a small patch of sky for more than 50 hours with the ultra-sensitive  Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), astronomers have for the first time identified discrete sources that account for nearly all the radio waves coming from distant galaxies. They found that about 63 percent of the background radio emission [continue reading]

apr 272013
 
Bursts of Star Formation can Reduce Future Galaxy Growth

  Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have shown for the first time that bursts of star formation have a major impact far beyond the boundaries of their host galaxy. These energetic events can affect galactic gas at distances of up to twenty times greater than the visible size of the galaxy – altering [continue reading]

mrt 142013
 
Highly Active Galaxies in the Very Early Universe Found

  Record-breaking haul of distant galaxies includes most distant detection of water published to date   Observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) show that the most vigorous bursts of star formation in the cosmos took place much earlier than previously thought. The results are published in a set of papers to appear in the [continue reading]

jan 272013
 
Giant, Magnetized Outflows from our Galactic Center

  Two years ago, CfA astronomers reported the discovery of giant, twin lobes of gamma-ray emission protruding about 50,000 light-years above and below the plane of our Milky Way galaxy, and centered on the supermassive black hole at our galaxy’s core. The scientists argued then that the bubbles were produced either by an eruption from [continue reading]

okt 082012
 
Twists and Turns in Interacting Galaxies

  Almost thirty years ago the Infrared Astronomy Satellite, IRAS, discovered that the Universe contained many fabulously luminous galaxies, some of them more than a thousand times brighter than our own galaxy, but which are practically invisible at optical wavelengths. The reason for their optical dimness is that their bright light comes not from stars, [continue reading]

aug 222012
 
Fierce Galactic Winds from Starbursts End New Star Formation

  Fierce galactic winds powered by an intense burst of star formation may blow gas right out of massive galaxies, shutting down their ability to make new stars. Matter blasts out of the starburst galaxy M82 in this composite image from three observatories. Image Credit: Smithsonian Institution/Chandra X-ray Observatory Sifting through images and data from [continue reading]