sep 172012
 
Supernovae Now Counted

  Almost one in five exploding stars in nearby galaxies is simply not seen, astronomers have determined. For galaxies further out, that fraction doubles. This finding clears the way for these stellar beacons to be used as a good measure of how fast galaxies made stars earlier in the Universe’s history. Key evidence for this “body count” [continue reading]

sep 122012
 
Massive Star Has Extreme Large Magnetic Field

  A group of astronomers led by Gregg Wade of the Royal Military College of Canada have used the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) at The University of Texas at Austin’s McDonald Observatory and the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) on Hawaii’s Mauna Kea to measure the most magnetic massive star yet. Their work is published in yesterday’s [continue reading]

aug 232012
 
Halo of Neutrinos Alters Physics of Supernovae

  Sparse halos of neutrinos within the hearts of exploding stars exert a previously unrecognized influence on the physics of the explosion and may alter which elements can be forged by these violent events. The titanic supernova, called SN 1987A, blazed with the power of 100 million suns for several months following its discovery on [continue reading]