apr 052013
 
Farthest Type Ia Supernova So Far Discovered

  NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has found the farthest supernova so far of the type used to measure cosmic distances. Supernova UDS10Wil, nicknamed SN Wilson after American President Woodrow Wilson, exploded more than 10 billion years ago. This is a Hubble Space Telescope view of supernova SN UDS10Wil, nicknamed SN Wilson that exploded over 10 [continue reading]

okt 082012
 
Twists and Turns in Interacting Galaxies

  Almost thirty years ago the Infrared Astronomy Satellite, IRAS, discovered that the Universe contained many fabulously luminous galaxies, some of them more than a thousand times brighter than our own galaxy, but which are practically invisible at optical wavelengths. The reason for their optical dimness is that their bright light comes not from stars, [continue reading]

aug 242012
 
Type Ia Supernovae Have Different Origins

  Exploding stars called Type 1a supernovae are ideal for measuring cosmic distances because they are bright enough to spot across the Universe and have relatively the same luminosity everywhere. Although astronomers have many theories about the kinds of star systems involved in these explosions (or progenitor systems), no one has ever directly observed one—until [continue reading]

mei 052012
 
Quasars shine a new light on cosmic distances

  An international team of scientists has developed a method to determine the distances to quasars throughout the universe. This could allow quasars to be used as standard candles. The researchers found characteristic patterns in the light given off by a group of quasars and say that these regularities are directly related to the redshift [continue reading]