feb 282013
 
The Mystery of a Super-Fast Spinning Supermassive Black Hole

  Two X-ray space observatories, NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and the European Space Agency’s XMM-Newton, have teamed up to measure definitively, for the first time, the spin rate of a black hole with a mass 2 million times that of our Sun.  This artist’s concept illustrates a supermassive black hole with millions to [continue reading]

sep 152012
 
Mystery Spheres on Mars (With Video)

  NASA’s long-lived rover Opportunity has returned an image of the Martian surface that is puzzling researchers. Spherical objects concentrated at an outcrop called Kirkwood on the western rim of Endeavour Crater differ in several ways from iron-rich spherules nicknamed “blueberries” the rover found at its landing site in early 2004. Using its Microscopic Imager, Opportunity [continue reading]

aug 302012
 
Record -Breaking Supernova  Helps Understand Distant Galaxy

  Nature hath no fury like a dying star – and astronomers couldn’t be happier…   An international research team, led by Edo Berger of Harvard University, made the most of a dying star’s fury to probe a distant galaxy some 9.5 billion light-years distant. The dying star, which lit the galactic scene, is the [continue reading]

aug 172012
 
Magnesium Plays an Important Role in Planet Formation

  An international team, led by EXOEarths researchers of the Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto (CAUP), proposes that metals like Magnesium might have an important role in the formation of low mass planets. A swirling disk of planet-building dust. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC) The team, lead by CAUP researcher Vardan Zh. Adibekyan, [continue reading]

mei 082012
 
Atomic Nuclei Explain How Supernovae Formed Heavier Elements

  New insight into the behavior of atomic nuclei may explain how gigantic star explosions, or supernovae, have formed the elements that are crucial to mankind. SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION: Today astrophysicists are struggling to perform computer simulations of a supernova (a massive star explosion). New knowledge about atomic nuclei from the University of Oslo may make such simulations [continue reading]