apr 122013
 
Explosive Crater Twins on Mars

  Dramatic underground explosions, perhaps involving ice, are responsible for the pits inside two large martian impact craters, here imaged by ESA’s Mars Express on 4 January. High-Resolution Stereo Camera nadir and color channel data taken during orbit 11467 on 4 January 2013 by ESA’s Mars Express have been combined to produce this color view of two craters, both [continue reading]

apr 062013
 
The Power Behind Primordial Soup Discovered

  Researchers at the University of Leeds may have solved a key puzzle about how objects from space could have kindled life on Earth. An artists impression of a meteorite landing in a hot, acidic pool of liquids. Image Credit: James McKay 2013 (www.jamesmckay.info) While it is generally accepted that some important ingredients for life came from [continue reading]

mrt 132013
 
Conditions on Mars Once Favorable for Life

  An analysis of a rock sample collected by NASA’s Curiosity rover shows ancient Mars could have supported living microbes.   Scientists identified sulfur, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and carbon — some of the key chemical ingredients for life — in the powder Curiosity drilled out of a sedimentary rock near an ancient stream bed [continue reading]

mrt 082013
 
Water Channels Discovered on Mars

  New maps of the subsurface of Mars show for the first time buried channels below the surface of the red planet. Mars is considered to have been cold and dry over the past 2.5 billion years, but these channels suggest evidence of flooding. Fig. 1. The location of the ~ 1000 km Marte Vallis [continue reading]

feb 052013
 
Evidence There Once Was Water on the Surface of Mars!

  Scientists at the University of Glasgow together with the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre and the Natural History Museum (London) have discovered the first evidence of water dissolving the surface of Mars. The etch pits on the Nakhla meteorite sample which the team examined. Image Credit: Univ. of Glasgow In a paper published in [continue reading]

jan 252013
 
Thawing 'Dry Ice' on Mars Proves the Planet is Still Active

  Researchers using NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) see seasonal changes on far-northern Martian sand dunes caused by warming of a winter blanket of frozen carbon dioxide. Seasonal Changes on Far-Northern Mars: The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter snapped this series of false-color pictures of sand dunes in the [continue reading]