apr 042013
 
Green Pea Galaxies May Give Insight in the Early Universe

  The rare Green Pea galaxies discovered by the general public in 2007 could help confirm astronomers’ understanding of reionization, a pivotal stage in the evolution of the early Universe, say University of Michigan researchers. A montage of the six Green Pea galaxies that University of Michigan astronomy researchers studied. Image Credit: Anne Jaskot Reionization [continue reading]

jan 292013
 
Venus Behaves Like a Comet

  ESA’s Venus Express has made unique observations of Venus during a period of reduced solar wind pressure, discovering that the planet’s ionosphere balloons out like a comet’s tail on its night-side. The change in ionosphere of Venus during normal solar wind conditions (left) and reduced solar wind activity (right), as observed by ESA’s Venus Express [continue reading]

jan 272013
 
A Big Piece to the Solar Corona Puzzle Solved

  The Sun’s visible surface, or photosphere, is 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit. As you move outward from it, you pass through a tenuous layer of hot, ionized gas or plasma called the corona. The corona is familiar to anyone who has seen a total solar eclipse, since it glimmers ghostly white around the hidden Sun. This [continue reading]

jan 022013
 
Magnetic Fields Existed Even Before the First Stars

  Bochum physicist calculates field strengths in the early Universe   The early Universe consisted only of nonmagnetic elements and particles. Just how the magnetic forces came into existence has been researched by Prof. Dr. Reinhard Schlickeiser at the Institute of Theoretical Physics of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum. In the journal Physical Review Letters, he describes [continue reading]

okt 292012
 
Supermassive Black Hole Inflates Giant Bubble

  Using a brand-new radio telescope, astronomers have produced one of the best images ever made at the lowest frequencies of giant bubbles produced by a supermassive black hole. The observations were performed at frequencies ranging from 20 to 160 MHz which are normally used for communications by airplane pilots. The picture shows what looks [continue reading]

okt 112012
 
Studying Neutron Stars on Earth

  Scientists from the universities of Kiel and Düsseldorf (both Germany) have developed a method to simulate gigantic magnetic fields that normally occur on neutron stars only. The physicists Professor Hartmut Löwen (Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf) and Professor Michael Bonitz (Kiel University) have now published these results in the journal “Physical Review Letters”. In the article they [continue reading]