dec 122012
 
Vega Older Than Thought! What Does That Mean for Other Stars?

  Vega, a star astronomers have used as a touchstone to measure other stars’ brightness for thousands of years, may be more than 200 million years older than previously thought. That’s according to new findings from the University of Michigan. Vega, the brightest star in the constellation Lyra. Image Credit: John Monnier (University of Michigan) The [continue reading]

okt 112012
 
Studying Neutron Stars on Earth

  Scientists from the universities of Kiel and Düsseldorf (both Germany) have developed a method to simulate gigantic magnetic fields that normally occur on neutron stars only. The physicists Professor Hartmut Löwen (Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf) and Professor Michael Bonitz (Kiel University) have now published these results in the journal “Physical Review Letters”. In the article they [continue reading]

okt 082012
 
How pulsars slow down with age

  Researchers at the University of Southampton have developed a model which explains how the spin of a pulsar slows down as the star gets older. The famous Crab Nebula (M1, NGC 1952 or Taurus A) is the remnant of SN 1054, a pulsar wind nebula with a diameter of 11 light-years, located in the Perseus Arm [continue reading]

sep 062012
 
Where are the Companions of Supernovae?

  Japanese researchers discovered that a Type Ia supernova occurs after its companion star evolves into a faint helium white dwarf in many cases, given the fact that the white dwarf is spinning in the progenitor system. Figure 1. Configuration of progenitor binary system in the case of a red-giant (left) and a white dwarf (right, [continue reading]

jul 252012
 
A Pulsar with a Tremendous Hiccup

  Scientists discover a young and energetic neutron star with an unusually irregular rotation   Pulsars are superlative cosmic beacons. These compact neutron stars rotate about their axes many times per second, emitting radio waves and gamma radiation into space. Using ingenious data analysis methods, researchers from the Max Planck Institutes for Gravitational Physics and [continue reading]

jul 192012
 
Astounding Spiral Galaxy form the Early Universe Discovered

  A team led by an astronomer at the Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics, University of Toronto, has discovered a spiral galaxy that appears to have formed a billion years before other spirals. The galaxy is 10.5 billion light-years from Earth, putting it at a time when the Universe was only three billion years [continue reading]