okt 062013
 
Large "Hot" Cocoon around a Little Baby Star Found

  A large hot molecular cloud around a very young star was discovered by ALMA. This hot cloud is about ten times larger than those found around typical solar-mass baby stars, which indicates that the star formation process has more diversity than ever thought. This result was published in the Astrophysical Journal on September 20th, [continue reading]

sep 022013
 
ALMA Found One of the Brightest and Massive Protostars

  Thanks to data detected with the ALMA radio telescope, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, Chilean and foreign astronomers were able to detect a star in formation–a protostar–that appears to be one of the brightest and massive found in our Milky Way galaxy. The giant  molecular cloud known as G331.5-0.1, which is located in the [continue reading]

aug 222013
 
Stellar Winds Scatter Star-Forming Material

  A University of Alberta astrophysicist’s 3-D computer animation is helping an international research team get an unprecedented look at star-forming gases escaping from the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 (The Sculptor Galaxy).    UAlberta astrophysicist Erik Rosolowsky created this 3-D rendering of carbon monoxide in the starburst galaxy NGC 253 (The Sculptor Galaxy).    Since 2011, [continue reading]

jul 262013
 
The Sculptor Galaxy and the Limits to Galactic Growth

  Astronomers have long assumed that when a galaxy produces too many stars too quickly, it greatly reduces its capacity for producing stars in the future. Now, a group of astronomers that includes Fabian Walter from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy were able to obtain the first detailed images of this type of self-limiting [continue reading]

jul 262013
 
Quasars Influence Galaxy Growth

  Quasars are among the brightest, oldest, most distant, and most powerful objects in the Universe. Powered by massive black holes at the center of most known galaxies, quasars can emit enormous amounts of energy, up to a thousand times the total output of the hundreds of billions of stars in our entire Milky Way. [continue reading]