jul 262013
 
The Sculptor Galaxy and the Limits to Galactic Growth

  Astronomers have long assumed that when a galaxy produces too many stars too quickly, it greatly reduces its capacity for producing stars in the future. Now, a group of astronomers that includes Fabian Walter from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy were able to obtain the first detailed images of this type of self-limiting [continue reading]

apr 272013
 
Bursts of Star Formation can Reduce Future Galaxy Growth

  Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have shown for the first time that bursts of star formation have a major impact far beyond the boundaries of their host galaxy. These energetic events can affect galactic gas at distances of up to twenty times greater than the visible size of the galaxy – altering [continue reading]

okt 082012
 
Twists and Turns in Interacting Galaxies

  Almost thirty years ago the Infrared Astronomy Satellite, IRAS, discovered that the Universe contained many fabulously luminous galaxies, some of them more than a thousand times brighter than our own galaxy, but which are practically invisible at optical wavelengths. The reason for their optical dimness is that their bright light comes not from stars, [continue reading]

jun 232012
 
Galaxy Developed from Multiple Mergers

  A team of astronomers led by Professor Yoshiaki Taniguchi (Ehime University) has concluded that the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Arp 220 (Figure 1) developed from a multiple merger among four or more galaxies. Their new imaging data from the Subaru Telescope and optical spectroscopy from the W. M. Keck Observatory revealed two tidal tails [continue reading]

jun 102012
 
Globular Star Clusters: The Survivors of a Massacre

  Our Milky Way galaxy is surrounded by some 200 compact groups of stars, containing up to a million stars each. At 13 billion years of age, these globular clusters are almost as old as the universe itself and were born when the first generations of stars and galaxies formed. A team of astronomers from [continue reading]