nov 092012
 
Neutron Stars Weighed by New Method

  Astronomers have used INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton to look into the neutron star in IGR J17252-3616, a highly obscured X-ray binary system. The data show how the neutron star, which is being fuelled by the stellar wind from its companion, is substantially deflecting the flow of the accreted material. Comparison with numerical simulations provides an [continue reading]

okt 132012
 
Stellar Winds in High-Speed Collision

  Two massive stars racing in orbit around each other have had their colliding stellar winds X-rayed for the first time, thanks to the combined efforts of ESA’s XMM-Newton and NASA’s Swift space telescopes. XMM-Newton observation of the core of the very massive cluster Cyg OB2 located in the constellation of Cygnus, 4700 light-years from [continue reading]

okt 112012
 
Surprising Spiral Structure Found Around Red Giant Star

  Astronomers have discovered a totally unexpected spiral structure in space. The strange shape, discovered in gas and dust surrounding the red giant star R Sculptoris, was probably created by a hidden companion star orbiting the star. The research, which appears in the journal Nature this week, gives new insight on how stars like the [continue reading]

sep 122012
 
Massive Star Has Extreme Large Magnetic Field

  A group of astronomers led by Gregg Wade of the Royal Military College of Canada have used the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) at The University of Texas at Austin’s McDonald Observatory and the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) on Hawaii’s Mauna Kea to measure the most magnetic massive star yet. Their work is published in yesterday’s [continue reading]

aug 042012
 
Supernova Progenitor Found?

  Type Ia supernovae are violent stellar explosions. Observations of their brightness are used to determine distances in the universe and have shown scientists that the cosmos is expanding at an accelerating rate. But there is still too little known about the specifics of the processes by which these supernovae form. New research, led by [continue reading]

apr 122012
 
Astronomers witness death of stars - in a 'solar sandstorm'

Sand storms in space have been discovered by astronomers watching the death-throes of giant stars. Three ‘red giants’ were observed having their atmospheres ripped away by a ‘superwind’ containing dusty grains of silica.  Astronomers have discovered sandstorms in space after using state-of-the-art techniques to search the atmospheres of distant, dying stars.  Superwinds carrying the dust that [continue reading]