aug 192012
 
How the Solar Wind Heats Up When it Should Not

  New research led by University of Warwick physicist Dr Kareem Osman has provided significant insight into how the solar wind heats up when it should not. The solar wind rushes outwards from the raging inferno that is our Sun, but from then on the wind should only get cooler as it expands beyond our [continue reading]

aug 052012
 
Exploring the Chemistry of Mars

A researcher at The Open University in the UK will take part in a mission to explore the chemistry of Mars when Curiosity lands on the planet. The area where NASA’s Curiosity rover will land has a geological diversity that scientists are eager to investigate, as seen in this false-color map based on data from NASA’s [continue reading]

jul 202012
 
Research on Hot Nuclear Matter that Permeated the Early Universe

  A review article appearing in today’s issue of the journal Science describes groundbreaking discoveries that have emerged from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA, synergies with the heavy-ion program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe, and the compelling questions that will drive this research forward [continue reading]

jul 012012
 
Space Tornadoes Power the Atmosphere of the Sun

  Mathematicians at the University of Sheffield, as part of an international team, have discovered tornadoes in space which could hold the key to power the atmosphere of the Sun to millions degrees of kelvin. Three images show how the tornado developed over a few hours. Image credit: Aberystwyth University The super tornadoes – which are thousands [continue reading]

jun 262012
 
Why Jet Streams Cross-Cut Saturn

  Turbulent jet streams, regions where winds blow faster than in other places, churn east and west across Saturn. Scientists have been trying to understand for years the mechanism that drives these wavy structures in Saturn’s atmosphere and the source from which the jets derive their energy. A particularly strong jet stream churns through Saturn’s [continue reading]

jun 212012
 
The Size of Martian 'Snowflakes' Calculated

  Mars’ carbon dioxide ‘snowflakes’ are about the size of red blood cells. Researchers have determined the size of CO2 snow particles on Mars, depicted in this artist’s rendering as a mist or fog that eventually settles to the surface as carbon dioxide snow. Image credit: NASA, Christine Daniloff/MIT News In the dead of a Martian [continue reading]